Program for 2014 IEEE Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering

Time Bayshore Foyer Carmel Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade Monterey San Carlos San Jose Santa Clara

Monday, May 5

07:00 am-06:15 pm Registration       Speaker Breakfast    
08:00 am-10:00 am   Opening Plenary and Keynote #1        
08:15 am-09:00 am     Exhibitor Breakfast    
09:30 am-10:00 am          
10:00 am-11:00 am EMC Regulations Part I   Applying Toy Tests to Consumer Products   Breaking Through the BRICs, Part 2 Operator protection for medical equipment? Risk factors for operator or patient protection
11:00 am-12:00 pm EMC Regulations Part II   An Implementation of Toy Safety Assessment Model   Global Product Certification - How Strong Is Your Product Life Cycle Process? Innovative approach to Product Realization
12:00 pm-01:30 pm   Lunch - Exhibits        
01:30 pm-02:30 pm KISS EMC Part I   Arc-Flash Explosion: What's the Real Risk?   Electrical Product Failures and Regulatory Compliance - An Engineering and Legal Perspective (Part I) Patient and Operator - different requirements
02:30 pm-03:30 pm KISS EMC Part II   Not Science Fiction: Isaac Asimov's Laws of Robotics in Product Safety Engineering   Electrical Product Failures and Regulatory Compliance - An Engineering and Legal Perspective (Part II) Observe users; improve device safety
03:30 pm-04:15 pm   Afternoon Break - Exhibits        
04:15 pm-05:15 pm EMC Fundamentals Part I   What does your touch current look like?   Regulatory Approval Brazil - Updates and Trends & Best Practices - a perspective straight from in-country labs Converting a Legacy Medical Device to a Wireless Device
05:15 pm-06:15 pm EMC Fundamentals Part II   Injury from Thermal Energy   Doing Business in Overseas Markets: Opportunities and Resources for U.S. Companies Documenting Risk Management In IECEE CB Scheme Test Report
06:15 pm-07:45 pm     Exhibitor Reception        

Tuesday, May 6

07:00 am-06:00 pm Registration       Speaker Breakfast    
08:00 am-08:45 am   Continental Breakfast - Exhibits        
08:45 am-09:45 am Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Design for EMC Compliance Part I   Test Method to Simulate Internal Short-Circuit in Lithium-ion Cells   Regulatory Labeling Why 500VA? IEC TC66 Investigation for the 500VA output requirement of dielectric withstand instruments
09:45 am-10:45 am Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Design for EMC Compliance Part II   Rechargeable Battery Condition Monitoring using Vibrational Properties   Becoming a Thought Leader Hazard Based Safety Engineering in Relation to Injury Epidemiology and Etiology
10:45 am-11:30 am   Coffee & Awards Ceremony        
11:30 am-12:45 pm   Lunch - Exhibits        
12:45 pm-01:45 pm Historical Methods of Testing EMI Gaskets   Certification Changes for Batteries in Electrical Devices   State of Wireless Power Transfer - Standards, Certification, Consortia, etc. Residential Solar and Electric Vehicle Bonding and Grounding Methods for Galvanic Compatibility
01:45 pm-02:45 pm ESD Design - Troubleshooting & Demonstrations Part I   Overview of IEC Safety Requirements for Micro Fuel Cells   Global Substance Regulations Impacting the Electrical Industry Equipotentiality and Grounding Derivation of grounding resistance for equipment
02:45 pm-03:45 pm ESD Design - Troubleshooting & Demonstrations Part II   Latent Defect Characterization using Lithium Ion Cells   RAPEX-System and Intervention of European Market Surveillance Authorities - Burden or Relief? Requirements For Modular Data Centers
03:45 pm-04:00 pm   Coffee Break - Exhibits        
04:00 pm-04:45 pm   Keynote #2 - Exhibits        
04:45 pm-06:00 pm   FIRST Demonstration - Exhibits        

Wednesday, May 7

07:00 am-12:30 pm Registration       Speaker Breakfast    
08:00 am-09:00 am Evaluating Interference Issues with Wireless Networks   Are Amps and Volts Created Equal?   ANEC The European consumer voice in standardization Energy Efficiency Testing
09:00 am-10:00 am How I Use Social Media & The Internet for Networking, Branding & Providing Customer Value   Lightning Surge Damage to Ethernet and POTS Ports Connected to Inside Wiring   Product DNA: Materials Traceability, Safety, and Collaborative Sustainability Comparison between fire enclosure requirements in IEC 60950-1 and IEC 62368-1
10:00 am-11:00 am Ken's Top Ten EMC Design Issues   Quantitative Solder Inspection with Computed Tomography   Safety Design Issues for Consumer Electronics Power Supplies IEC 62368-1: Latest News on the Standard and Its Adoption
11:00 am-12:45 pm   Closing Session        

Monday, May 5, 07:00 - 18:15

Registration

Room: Bayshore Foyer

Monday, May 5, 07:00 - 08:00

Speaker Breakfast

Room: San Carlos

Monday, May 5, 08:00 - 10:00

Opening Plenary and Keynote #1

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Bio: Jon Cobb has served as Vice President, Global Marketing at Stratasys from 2010 to 2012 and currently serves as Executive Vice President, Global Marketing of Stratasys Ltd. Stratasys (SSYS) is a publicly traded, multi-national company with revenues in excess of $500 million. Cobb has also held the position of Vice President and General Manager for the Dimension 3D printing business unit of Stratasys, since January of 2002. Cobb joined the company as Vice President of Marketing in August of 1995. Before joining the company, he served as Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Westec Security, Inc., and he has held various management-level sales and marketing positions with Lockheed Martin's Calcomp Division. Cobb has a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. http://www.stratasys.com/

Abstract: Even though 3D Printing has been around for over 20 years it is now hailed by some as having the power to fuel the next industrial revolution. Stratasys was one of the first to enter the 3D Printing space. Stratasys offers over 30 3D Printing solutions with material printing capabilities ranging from PLA to Ultem materials. Stratasys systems have been helping companies design better, safer and more reliable products for 25 years. Initially 3D Printing was primarily used by aerospace and automotive companies to assist in prototyping ideas. Today, the majority of 3D Printers are still used for prototyping, during the past 3 to 5 years there has been increased interest in 3D Printing for end use parts. The Stratasys customer base is broad, serving many industries. Consumer products, automotive, medical and aerospace are the largest commercial uses. Education, from grade school to post graduate education has accounted for over 20% of Stratasys sales for the past 10 years. The presentation will feature a variety of case studies highlighting education, product development, prototyping and its use in gaining regulatory approval and using 3D Printing to produce end use parts. Stratasys has used 3D Printing numerous times to win agency approval, Peppermint Energy used 3D printing to quickly move from concept to product sales, STARBASE and its Mission To Mars program is attracting young people to math and science education. Finally, meet Emma and learn how 3D Printing is changing people's lives today.

Monday, May 5, 08:15 - 09:00

Exhibitor Breakfast

Room: San Carlos

Monday, May 5, 09:30 - 10:00

Break - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Monday, May 5, 10:00 - 11:00

EMC Regulations Part I

Room: Carmel

Applying Toy Tests to Consumer Products

Room: Monterey
Applying Toy Tests to Consumer Products
Ted Eckert (Microsoft Corporation, USA)
Many electronic products commonly found in the household are not considered children's products and are not regulated as such. However, these products may still be accessible to children, and in some cases, they may have designs that make them appealing to young children. Toddlers and young children will pick up and play with devices ranging from remote controls to cell phones to imitate adults or because they appear to be toys. Although regulations may not require testing such products to the standards applicable to toys, doing so can reduce the risk that misuse or abuse of the product by young children will result in injury.

Breaking Through the BRICs, Part 2

Room: San Jose
Breaking Through the BRICs, Part 2
Mark W. Maynard (SIEMIC, Inc. & Telecommunication Certification Body Council, USA); Leslie Bai (SIEMIC, Inc., USA)
The emergent markets in Brazil, Russia, India and China, popularly referred to by the acronym BRIC, now are responsible for a growing portion of profits for global companies. Working against this prize is a formidable maze of culture, laws, and overlapping regulations, causing confusion surrounding the regulatory requirements. For those entering the BRIC marketplace with electrical and electronic products, knowledge of how to obtain the necessary approvals is needed. Preparation is paramount to face the distinct and unique obstacles that will be encountered. Distance, language, unfamiliar local business norms, and unsophisticated commercial market conditions can sometime make this a difficult and expensive procedure for the uninformed. In Part 2 of this paper, covering India and China, we will reveal the major regulatory compliance components in the mix for these two countries: the government agencies, the standards, the confounding bureaucracies, and some of the key unwritten rules in these emerging markets, and help product developers and manufacturers to access this massive group of desirable customers, navigating clear pathways to marketing and selling their electronic products.

Operator protection for medical equipment? Risk factors for operator or patient protection

Room: Santa Clara
Operator protection for medical equipment? Risk factors for operator or patient protection
Frank O'Brien (O'Brien Compliance Management, USA)
There's 2 ways IEC 60950 insulation requirements can be considered appropriate for medical insulation, either: Within medical electrical (ME) Equipment, we could use the Means of Operator Protection (MOOP) insulation requirements allowed when risk assessment determines appropriate in accordance with Clause 4.6. This is only allowed by 3rd ed. OR We could use the ME system requirements in Clause 16. Appropriate non‐medical equipment standards include IT equipment, IEC 60950‐1, measuring/lab/process control equipment, IEC 61010‐1, and audio & video equipment, IEC 60065. IT and A/V equipment are merging into a common standard, IEC 62368‐1. This is allowed by 2nd and 3rd ed.

Monday, May 5, 11:00 - 12:00

EMC Regulations Part II

Room: Carmel

An Implementation of Toy Safety Assessment Model

Room: Monterey
An Implementation of Toy Safety Assessment Model
Shu Lun Mak (The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
Many toys manufacturers developed the new products in order to survive in the serious market competition. They relied on the current toys product safety assessment model. In the current toy product safety testing, the third party testing laboratories just followed the mandatory safety regulations and standards to test the products. Some newly developed feature or function of the products were not properly evaluated. It is often found that the products met all mandatory regulations and standards, it still causes the serious accident. In this paper, we discuss the current assessment model by analyzing two accident cases and evaluate the effectiveness of implementing the enhanced toys safety assessment model.

Global Product Certification - How Strong Is Your Product Life Cycle Process?

Room: San Jose
Global Product Certification - How Strong Is Your Product Life Cycle Process?
Dennis W Bartelt (360 Compliance Partners & Go Global Compliance Inc., USA); Peter Merguerian (President Go Global Compliance Inc, USA)
This paper examines key aspects of the product life cycle process and explores how gaps in that process can create product compliance risks. Examples of life cycle areas include engineering, supply chain, marketing, documentation, quality systems and change control.Inter dependencies between various process steps and linkages to cross functional areas are discussed. The content of the presentation is based on real life industry exposure and experiences of the presenter and does not delve into ISO or other quality systems in any great detail. The analysis exposes the serious nature of how not having a robust compliance process in place, which should interact and bridge across the life cycle process, could impact the performance of a product potentially leading to the product not complying with regulatory requirements. The paper is intended to provide the listener with strong concepts and approaches in dealing with compliance programs intended to monitor and control the regulatory and safety performance of products. The discussion is at a high level which allows the listener to bridge the concepts across a broad spectrum of life cycle processes

Innovative approach to Product Realization

Room: Santa Clara
Innovative approach to Product Realization
Roger Martin (Compliance Dynamics, LLC, USA)
In today's fast moving markets it has become increasingly difficult for companies to efficiently manage change. Adversely affecting their products time to market. Quite often a company's method for addressing the following areas end-up taking a singular and separate approach: - Device Master Record - Design History File - Risk Management - Quality Management System Product Lifecycle Management has traditionally been thought of as a Bill of Material management tool, or the process of managing the entire lifecycle of a product from its conception, through design and manufacture, to service and obsolescence. What if the same data (or object) created to support how you manufacture your product, could also satisfy many other requirements such as your Device Master Record, Design History File and integrate directly into your Quality Management System? This very same solution would enable you to capture your due diligence associated with risk management. This solution, a "Single Source of the Truth", effectively and efficiently leverages the same data (information) to address not only your internal business practices, but also efficiently fulfilling your compliance needs as well. Product Lifecycle Management can cross-functionally integrate people, data, processes and business systems and provide a product information backbone for companies and their extended enterprise. The presentation will speak to, and demonstrate an enterprise business solution that is an innovative and efficient approach to Product Realization through Product Lifecycle Management.

Monday, May 5, 12:00 - 13:30

Lunch - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Monday, May 5, 13:30 - 14:30

KISS EMC Part I

Room: Carmel

Arc-Flash Explosion: What's the Real Risk?

Room: Monterey
Arc-Flash Explosion: What's the Real Risk?
Jonathan Hamilton (Megger Instruments Ltd & Gambica, United Kingdom)
A simple search of Google reveals that much is known of the effects of arc-flash explosion. However is it truly addressed in our product design today and if so, is that more by luck than judgement? As an expert within IEC TC66 and representative on ACOS, the Author Jonathan Hamilton has regularly come up against the challenge of how to successfully mitigate the risk of arc-flash explosion. However, despite the numerous examples of it's effects, little seems to be known about how to design a product to be safe from it's effects. This presentation explores the origins and theory of the arc-flash explosion risk, how it is addressed in today's standards and what opportunities are available to protect product users further. Several examples of the devastation that such an explosion can cause will be dissected and how this risk can be avoided in product design. Other factors such as the effect of altitude will be covered as well.

Electrical Product Failures and Regulatory Compliance - An Engineering and Legal Perspective (Part I)

Room: San Jose
Electrical Product Failures and Regulatory Compliance - An Engineering and Legal Perspective
Kenneth Ross (Bowman and Brooke LLP, USA)
The role of the engineering investigation is to provide information for the legal and management teams to make decisions concerning what action if any, is indicated. An objective engineering evaluation is therefore required to determine the root cause(s) of the failure, whether the failure stems from a systemic problem in the product design or manufacture and the potential severity of subsequent failures. If a systemic problem is identified, it is then necessary to determine what portion of the field population is susceptible to the identified problem. The role of potential consumer abuse must also be evaluated. Also relevant is whether the product being investigated has a hazard function (probability of field failure as a function of time in service) that differs materially from similar products in service. It is also sometimes important to predict expected future failures based on field populations and expected product retirement. After the investigation is complete, the legal and management teams must decide whether the electrical product is subject to the jurisdiction of the CPSC and government agencies in other countries and what must be done to satisfy their legal requirements. This could involve reporting to the agency and possibly undertaking a recall. The effect of these actions on future product liability risk must also be considered. This presentation would be over 2 50 minute sessions. Speakers would be Attorney Kenneth Ross and Principal Engineer at Exponent, John Loud.

Patient and Operator - different requirements

Room: Santa Clara
Patient and Operator - different requirements
Grant Schmidbauer (Nemko USA, Inc., USA)
IEC 60601-1, Ed. 3 was published in 2005, and Amendment 1 in 2012 (now called Ed. 3.1). With it's introduction, there are significantly different requirements for the patient compared for the operator. The standard has introduced Means of Patient Protection (MOPP) for the patient. The standard has introduced Means of Operator Protection (MOOP) for the operator. The basis of the introduction of MOPP and MOOP is that for many types of Medical equipment, the operator is a healthy (normal) person, and the Medical equipment has an interface much like a computer, therefore why treat the operator as a patient. As a result, there is now a distinction of treating (protecting) the operator and the patient differently. MOPP is based on the similar protection afforded by IEC 60601-1 Ed. 2 ; whereas MOOP is based on the protection afforded by IEC 60950-1. This presentation will look into the main differences between MOPP and MOOP

Monday, May 5, 14:30 - 15:30

KISS EMC Part II

Room: Carmel

Not Science Fiction: Isaac Asimov's Laws of Robotics in Product Safety Engineering

Room: Monterey
Safe Product Design, Forensic Engineering, and Asimov's Laws of Robotics
Louis Bilancia (Synnovation Engineering, Inc., USA)
Isaac Asimov wrote a series of science fiction stories regarding failure analysis of complex systems: his fictional positronic brained robots. His stories revolved around his "Three Laws of Robotics". One, a robot may not allow harm to come to a human either through action or inaction. Two, a robot must obey all commands unless they conflict with the first law. Three, a robot must protect its own existence unless doing so conflicts with the first or second laws. We are surrounded by automatic systems that routinely violate these three laws, yet some systems, such as implanted pacemakers and defibrillators have specific and distinct circuitry and firmware that implements exactly these rules. This paper presents a series of examples (1) of systems that are well implemented examples of Asmov's Three Laws, (2) of systems that categorically fail to implement the Three Laws, and lastly (3) tie the Three Laws into the Criticality and Severity Analysis (FMEA/CA and FMEA/SA) found in MIL-STD-1629A and SAE J1739 Failure Modes and Effects Analysis standards.

Electrical Product Failures and Regulatory Compliance - An Engineering and Legal Perspective (Part II)

Room: San Jose
Electrical Product Failures and Regulatory Compliance - An Engineering and Legal Perspective
Kenneth Ross (Bowman and Brooke LLP, USA)
The role of the engineering investigation is to provide information for the legal and management teams to make decisions concerning what action if any, is indicated. An objective engineering evaluation is therefore required to determine the root cause(s) of the failure, whether the failure stems from a systemic problem in the product design or manufacture and the potential severity of subsequent failures. If a systemic problem is identified, it is then necessary to determine what portion of the field population is susceptible to the identified problem. The role of potential consumer abuse must also be evaluated. Also relevant is whether the product being investigated has a hazard function (probability of field failure as a function of time in service) that differs materially from similar products in service. It is also sometimes important to predict expected future failures based on field populations and expected product retirement. After the investigation is complete, the legal and management teams must decide whether the electrical product is subject to the jurisdiction of the CPSC and government agencies in other countries and what must be done to satisfy their legal requirements. This could involve reporting to the agency and possibly undertaking a recall. The effect of these actions on future product liability risk must also be considered. This presentation would be over 2 50 minute sessions. Speakers would be Attorney Kenneth Ross and Principal Engineer at Exponent, John Loud.

Observe users; improve device safety

Room: Santa Clara
Observe users; improve device safety
Frank O'Brien (O'Brien Compliance Management, USA)
Up until now there's been too much emphasis on designing to make a device "idiot proof". This has provided some benefit, but what Usability Engineering is reminding us is that it's the designers who are viewed as idiots by the users. It's the users who are the experts (in usability). The focus of this presentation will be on Usability Engineering for medical devices. We'll look at the present state of medical device safety. The data shows that poor Usability is to blame for more preventable deaths than traffic collisions and firearms combined. We're beginning to better understand how to deal with poor Usability. We'll look at new Usability Engineering process requirements. I'll provide an overview on how we can better control the risks associated with poor Usability. Poor Usability represents the low lying fruit for safer products. We'll focus on medical devices, but the principals hold for all products.

Monday, May 5, 15:30 - 16:15

Afternoon Break - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Monday, May 5, 16:15 - 17:15

EMC Fundamentals Part I

Room: Carmel

What does your touch current look like?

Room: Monterey
What does your touch current look like?
Peter Perkins (P. E. Perkins PE, USA)
This paper responds to continued questions regarding the measurement of non-sinusoidal touch current with 'spikes' as introduced by Switched Mode Power Supplies and their performance modifiers - PFC correction circuits and Energy Efficiency control circuits. The history is given to provide the proper background, The IEC electric shock level requirements are reviewed especially pointing out the factor of safety designed into these requirements. The allowance for high-frequency components is discussed as included in the IEC 60990 touch current measurement circuits. Examples are shown for AC, DC and mixed AC/DC waveforms with emphasis on the peak values and their proper measurement.

Regulatory Approval Brazil - Updates and Trends & Best Practices - a perspective straight from in-country labs

Room: San Jose

A general overview on Latin America for 2013, showing the great changes that happened during the year. Latin America competed in an industry where phone number portability has been adopted in almost all countries, where laws encourage competition and there's a market with a high degree of penetration in technology, operators have not only had to go to the limit with prices, they have been forced to improve services and capture segments not reached previously by the telecommunications industry. Brazil, being the biggest market in the region, deserves focus as major changes are to come in 2014 and beyond as the country prepares to meet the new challenges to improve infrastructure and open spectrum to meet to massive increase in data traffic created by mobile devices. An in-depth look at the two agencies InMetro and Anatel and the Regulatory Approval process, followed by an update for upcoming new Regulations on 2.5 GHz, 700 MHz, WRC-15 for additional Frequencies on IMT, and Femtocell Regulation. Closing with Best Practices for success in Laboratory Testing in Brazil with a perspective straight from In-country labs. (Possible guest appearance from CPqD or Ibrace, OCD Brazil).

Regulatory Approval Brazil - Updates and Trends & Best Practices - a perspective straight from in-country labs
Elizabeth Perrier (Product Regulatory Compliance- Latin America & Orbis Compliance LLC, USA)
An general overview on Latin America for 2013, showing the great regulatory changes happened during 2013 and 2014 thus far. Latin America consumers like never before have a voice as cell number portability has been adopted in almost all countries, and where laws now encourage competition. The Latin market has embraced mobile devices which is creating great challenges for operators and regulators as they rethinking their current infrastructure to accommodate for current and future growth of data traffic in their networks. Brazil, being the biggest market in the region, deserves focus as major changes are to come in 2014 and beyond as the country prepares to meet these new challenges to improve infrastructure and open spectrum. An in-depth look at the two agencies InMetro and Anatel and the Regulatory Approval process, followed by an update for upcoming new Regulations on 2.5 GHz, 700 MHz, WRC-15 for additional Frequencies on IMT, and Femtocell Regulation. Closing with Best Practices for success in Laboratory Testing in Brazil with a perspective straight from In-country labs.

Converting a Legacy Medical Device to a Wireless Device

Room: Santa Clara
Converting a Legacy Medical Device to a Wireless Device
Nicholas Abbondante (Intertek, USA)
An increasing number of devices in the medical field are becoming wireless in order to reduce clutter, improve handling, provide remote access, improve aesthetics, speed up access to data and facilitate electronic medical records. As patients leave hospitals and other medical facilities to continue their healthcare in the home, wireless devices are easier for patients to use and provide them with more mobility. Wireless devices also allow for easier access to patient files but the transition is not always simple and straightforward. When converting a legacy medical device into a wireless device, many factors need to be considered to comply with regulatory requirements and ensure the safety of the staff and patient. To keep up with these regulations in an ever-changing industry, manufacturers' products must remain compliant in order to be sold in the marketplace. During this presentation, Nicholas Abbondante, chief EMC engineer at Intertek, will inform attendees of the different types of testing, labeling, certifications and regulatory considerations necessary when transitioning to a wireless medical device. He will also discuss the pros and cons of wireless energy transfers. Speaker: Nicholas Abbondante serves as chief EMC engineer at Intertek. In his 12 years with the company, Nick has been involved in testing a wide range of radio and electronic equipment to EMC requirements for regulatory domains around the world, specializing in transmitters. He is a member of the TCB Council and participates in the ANSI C63.10 and ANSI C63.26 radio standards writing committees. Nick has a Bachelor's degree in physics from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI).

Monday, May 5, 17:15 - 18:15

EMC Fundamentals Part II

Room: Carmel

Injury from Thermal Energy

Room: Monterey
Injury from Thermal Energy
Richard Nute (IEEE Product Safety Engineering Society & Richard Nute Product Safety Consultant, USA)
Thermal energy transfer is responsible for many different types of injuries, most of which are called burns. Common to all of these injuries is the basic injury model: all injuries require a hazardous energy source, a means of transferring the energy to the body, and susceptibility of the body to the amount of energy transferred to it. This paper develops and discusses a basic model of how certain types of injuries occur from thermal energy. Each of the three parts of the injury model is defined so that this material can be applied to a wide range of thermal injury situations.

Doing Business in Overseas Markets: Opportunities and Resources for U.S. Companies

Room: San Jose
Doing Business in Overseas Markets: Opportunities and Resources for U.S. Companies
Shannon Fraser (United States Department of Commerce & United States Commercial Service - Silicon Valley, USA); Aileen Nandi (San Jose Export Assistance Center, USA)
Numerous federal government resources exist for U.S. companies aiming to develop or expand their exports to overseas markets. Most of these resources are free-of-charge, and virtually every major U.S. city has a U.S. Commercial Service-Export Assistance Center to provide guidance to U.S. small and medium companies aiming to expand globally. Overseas, our colleagues at the Commercial Section of all U.S. Embassies and Consulates worldwide (Foreign Commercial Service) serve as invaluable resources to U.S. firm aiming to connect with overseas companies, partners, and buyers. Because these export resources are federally-funded, extremely limited marketing and promotional opportunities exist to put forward the information on U.S. Commercial Service export resources to U.S. companies. Most marketing and outreach is conducted through word-of-mouth and U.S. Commercial Service attendance at U.S. and international conferences that focus on advancing international business opportunities overseas. Thus, the U.S. Commercial Service - Silicon Valley office is providing a presentation submission, entitled "Doing Business in Overseas markets: Opportunities and Resources for U.S. Companies" for the consideration of the program committee of the 2014 IEEE Symposium on Product Compliance Engineering, to take place in San Jose from May 5-7, 2014. This presentation will highlight U.S. government programs and resources that advance global market and sales opportunities for U.S. companies, namely market analysis and reports, Gold Key Service (B2B Matchmaking Program), International Company Profile (Background Check on Potential Overseas Partners), Single Company Promotion (Product Launch/Splash Event) , Trade Missions, Advocacy Programs, as well as additional resources provided by the U.S. Export-Import Bank, Trade and Development Agency, Small Business Administration, and Overseas Private Investment Corporation, among others. In addition to the U.S. Commercial Service office here in Silicon Valley, the Bureau of Industry and Security and the soon-to-be-established Patent and Trademark Office are additional local resources available to U.S. companies. The final portion of the presentation highlights work that has been undertaken by the Foreign Commercial Service Energy Team in Brazil, including two publically-cleared success stories of two U.S. energy companies that have expanded to the Brazilian market. Thank you for your consideration of this presentation, and if any questions arise, please let me know. Shannon.Fraser@trade.gov

Documenting Risk Management In IECEE CB Scheme Test Report

Room: Santa Clara
Documenting Risk Management In IECEE CB Scheme Test Report
Paul D. Evers (UL LLC, USA)
Presentation will highlight the expectation of the IECEE for the minimum requirements for the documentation that must appear in a test report, including an example from IECEE Operational Document OD-2044. Most manufacturers of Medical Electrical Equipment and Medical Electrical Systems should already be performing risk management and have a quality management system in place, complying with all of the requirements of ISO 14971 and ISO 13485. IEC60601-1 requires the use of ISO 14971 to the extent necessary to make the decision to proceed with initial production. The presentation will address: • Risk Management is required by IEC60601-1 and national standards, • The IECEE CB Scheme Test Reports are accepted globally for documenting the evaluation of Medical Electrical Equipment and Medical Electrical Systems, and • The IECEE provides a guidance document on the extent of information to be included in the Test Report related to Risk Management.

Monday, May 5, 18:15 - 19:45

Exhibitor Reception

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Tuesday, May 6, 07:00 - 18:00

Registration

Room: Bayshore Foyer

Tuesday, May 6, 07:00 - 08:00

Speaker Breakfast

Room: San Carlos

Tuesday, May 6, 08:00 - 08:45

Continental Breakfast - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Tuesday, May 6, 08:45 - 09:45

Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Design for EMC Compliance Part I

Room: Carmel
Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Design for EMC Compliance
Mark Montrose (Montrose Compliance Services, Inc., USA)
This tutorial allows engineers to understand how a printed circuit board, integrated into a system enclosure, operates in its electromagnetic environment that includes both emissions and immunity regulatory requirements not to mention self-compatibility. Printed circuit boards must be designed using transmission line theory along with a sound understanding of electromagnetic theory. To teach complex electromagnetic theory, a unique presentation of "EMC Made Simple" is given which means one can convert complicated calculus to algebra by thinking and working in the time domain instead of the frequency domain (Maxwell's Equations transformed to Ohms Law). In order for transmission lines to propagate an electromagnetic field from a source to load means several operational conditions must be present. These conditions include the need for an optimal low loss RF transmission line path along with its return path, proper voltage referencing, an enhanced power distribution network and incorporating protective design features to minimize common-mode currents injected into interconnects. Proper layout not only assures functionality, but also compliance with EMC for residential, commercial (IT, medical, communication systems, etc.) and military applications.

Test Method to Simulate Internal Short-Circuit in Lithium-ion Cells

Room: Monterey
Test Method to Simulate Internal Short-Circuit in Lithium-ion Cells
Alvin Wu (Underwriters Laboratories Taiwan Co., Ltd., Taiwan)
Lithium-ion battery becomes the dominant energy source for portable, stationary and motive applications due to its excellent performance, such as long cycle life, low self-discharge rate and high energy/power density. However, safety is always a serious concern as lithium-ion batteries can potentially lead to thermal runaway, resulting in the explosive release of energy along with fire in a worst case field event. Many field reports cite internal short circuits (ISCs) as the most possible intermediate cause for the overheating of the cell. Though other test methods exist to simulate ISCs in lithium-ion cells, the Indentation Induced ISC (IIISC) test was developed based on best-practice principles to provide a practical and simple method that is very suitable for battery safety standards. This test method is able to simulate how a lithium-ion cell behaves when subjected to an ISC condition, which will help mitigate the hazards of ISCs and support the safe commercialization of lithium-ion batteries. In this presentation, UL will introduce the key characteristics of ISC events, and the fundamental rationale to develop the indentation type ISC test to simulate the localized heating condition. Some real test cases on cells with different safety designs will also be demonstrated to show the capabilities of the test method to effectively assess the safety performance of different lithium-ion battery techniques.

Regulatory Labeling

Room: San Jose
Regulatory Labeling
Gary Schrempp (Dell Inc, USA)
This presentation will be a review of the principles and regulations of Regulatory Labeling. Labeling and regulatory Marks are a major issue for compliance and customs clearance for all type of products. Every country can have its own Marks,labels and specialized requirements covering a number of different compliance areas such as safety, emc, telecom, wireless, energy, materials, packaging and recycling, resulting in a very confusing situation for compliance engineers. This presentation covers the history and rationale of labeling, the basics of labeling regulations, and new trends such as electronic labels, while presenting examples of of type of regulatory labels and discussing strategies for compliance.

Why 500VA? IEC TC66 Investigation for the 500VA output requirement of dielectric withstand instruments

Room: Santa Clara
Why 500VA for Hipot Testers? A TC66 Investigation to Explore the Necessity of the 500VA Hipot Tester
Nicholas Piotrowski (Associated Research Inc & Ikonix Group and Slaughter Company, USA)
The IEC 61010-1 3rd edition standard describes dielectric voltage withstand testing for electrical product safety. This standard requires a dielectric voltage withstand or high potential tester (aka "hipot") capable of producing 500VA of power. Recently, the need for a 500VA hipot transformer has been called into question by TC66. This paper will discuss the current 500VA hipot tester requirement per the 61010-1 3rd edition standard and the discussions by TC66 to change this requirement. The paper will illustrate the current investigation by TC66 to change the requirement as well as present breakdown testing results from various hipot instruments. The hipot tester output capability was tested vs reported breakdown voltage and current in order to determine if the output power affects the actual breakdown of solid insulation.

Tuesday, May 6, 09:45 - 10:45

Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Design for EMC Compliance Part II

Room: Carmel
Introduction to Printed Circuit Board Design for EMC Compliance
Mark Montrose (Montrose Compliance Services, Inc., USA)
This tutorial allows engineers to understand how a printed circuit board, integrated into a system enclosure, operates in its electromagnetic environment that includes both emissions and immunity regulatory requirements not to mention self-compatibility. Printed circuit boards must be designed using transmission line theory along with a sound understanding of electromagnetic theory. To teach complex electromagnetic theory, a unique presentation of "EMC Made Simple" is given which means one can convert complicated calculus to algebra by thinking and working in the time domain instead of the frequency domain (Maxwell's Equations transformed to Ohms Law). In order for transmission lines to propagate an electromagnetic field from a source to load means several operational conditions must be present. These conditions include the need for an optimal low loss RF transmission line path along with its return path, proper voltage referencing, an enhanced power distribution network and incorporating protective design features to minimize common-mode currents injected into interconnects. Proper layout not only assures functionality, but also compliance with EMC for residential, commercial (IT, medical, communication systems, etc.) and military applications.

Rechargeable Battery Condition Monitoring using Vibrational Properties

Room: Monterey
Rechargeable Battery Condition Monitoring using Vibrational Properties
Juha Backman and Antti Järvinen (Nokia Corporation, Finland)
A method is proposed for monitoring sealed battery condition, especially gas formation between electrode layers by detecting the vibrational characteristics on audio frequency range or low ultrasonic frequency range, measured using an actuator and one or more vibration sensors. The method is based on the change of physical properties of the battery when even small amounts of gas is formed. This changes the compressibility of the battery assembly, and the resulting separation of electrode layers has effect on the frequency dependent mechanical properties of the battery, including the response on the actuator side and on the transmission of vibration across the battery. Experimental results on two types of batteries (flat batteries with either hard or soft outer shell) are presented, verifying the assumption that the changes in vibrational properties are strong and easy to measure.

Becoming a Thought Leader

Room: San Jose
Becoming a Thought Leader
Melinda Marks (Mindshare PR)
To be known as a thought leader makes you a sought-after asset to your organization and to your industry. So what does it take to establish yourself as a thought leader - someone who has gained recognition for accomplishments, insight and vision, who is in high demand to provide insight in public forums? This session will provide a workshop on how to build a reputation as a thought leader, helping you share your ideas with a wider audience and increase your value to your organization and your industry. It will include: Identifying your niche Marketing your expertise Ways to describe your technical work to non-technical people Communication techniques to get and hold peoples' attention Writing skills to get your point across as quickly and easily as possible Networking skills to identify and interact with influencers and peers How to use social media channels to build your following

Hazard Based Safety Engineering in Relation to Injury Epidemiology and Etiology

Room: Santa Clara
Hazard Based Safety Engineering in Relation to Injury Epidemiology and Etiology
Thomas Lanzisero (UL LLC, USA)
Principles of hazard based safety engineering involve the study of the sources and mechanisms of injury in order to best protect against it. For example, hazard based safety engineering applied to product safety is based on the premise that various forms of injury occur when energy of sufficient magnitude and duration is imparted to a body part. The three-block model comprising energy sources, transfer mechanisms and susceptibilities to injury helps address the causes of injury, in order to better design and evaluate measures to protect against injury. These principles are reflected in similar approaches used in diverse areas of health and safety, including public health and aircraft and motor vehicle safety. Such approaches to injury causation and prevention are rooted in the epidemiology and etiology of disease, and reflected in technical works dating back to the 1940s, which provide a scientific and historical context. Approaches to public health make use of a broad base of scientific disciplines including epidemiology and etiology. Epidemiology is a branch of medical science that deals with the study of diseases, disorders or syndromes among populations, including their incidence, causes, effects, distribution and control. Epidemiological studies can be descriptive (who, what, when, where) or analytical (how), and their results can help identify risk factors as well as control and preventive measures. Etiology is an essential aspect of epidemiology that specifically focuses on causation of disease. This focus can help distinguish causative factors (e.g., necessary, sufficient or probabilistic) from other factors that are only correlative or contributory. More importantly, this etiological focus can help determine potential causal relationships between exposures and morbidity and mortality of a disease, that is, the rates of sickness and death for given populations, times or locations. The concept of addressing injury and safety based on the scientifically-based epidemiological framework used for disease and public health was extensively proposed by Dr. William Haddon Jr (M.D.), in his works beginning in the 1960s and spanning more than two decades. His epidemiological approach stemmed from his work in accident research, involving automobiles and aircraft, and causation and prevention of injury as scientifically-based rather than simply descriptively-based. This approach is based on unwanted release of energy or exposure to hazardous environments. This approach was also influenced by works of earlier researchers, and through collaboration with fellow researchers. Such application of the epidemiological approach of disease to injury, including the triad of host, environment and etiologic agents, helps to increase our understanding of injury, and the means to protect against it. This helps provide a scientific and historical context for other approaches that followed, such as principles of hazard based safety engineering.

Tuesday, May 6, 10:45 - 11:30

Coffee & Awards Ceremony

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Tuesday, May 6, 11:30 - 12:45

Lunch - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Tuesday, May 6, 12:45 - 13:45

Historical Methods of Testing EMI Gaskets

Room: Carmel
Historical Methods of Testing EMI Gaskets
George Kunkel (Spira Manufacturing Corporation, USA)
This paper presents the various test methods developed and employed to grade the effectiveness of EMI gaskets in sealing the seams of EMI shielded boxes and enclosures. The test methods presented and evaluated are: 1) Shielding Effectiveness Testing a. MIL-STD-285 b. MIL-STD-285 as re-defined by the EMC design engineering community c. SAE, ARP-1173 prepared by the EMC design engineering community d. MIL-G-83528 (superseded by ML-DTL-83528) 2) Transfer Impedance Test Methods - designed by the EMP design engineering community. The conclusion compares the shielding effectiveness test method presently being used with the transfer impedance test method. It also recommends revisions to the shielding effectiveness test method contained in MIL-DTL-83528 that will provide more accurate shielding levels and provide corrosion compatibility information of a gasket as tested against the various structural materials and finishes used by industry.

Certification Changes for Batteries in Electrical Devices

Room: Monterey
Certification Changes for Batteries in Electrical Devices
Rich Byczek (Intertek, USA)
Batteries play a significant role in the overall safety, performance and reliability of many electrical products used on a daily basis. As electrical products like mobile phones and tablets continue to become more technologically advanced and transportable, the number of battery-powered electrical devices will continue to increase. As a result, manufacturers need to be aware of evolving industry requirements as their products also continue to evolve. Standards such as the second edition of IEC 62133, which was recently adopted as part of the IECEE CB Scheme in the European Union, affects how manufacturers create, transport and sell their products globally. During this presentation, Rich Byczek, global technical lead for electric vehicles and energy storage at Intertek, will explain the national and global certification requirements related to batteries including UL 1642, UL 2054 and IEC 60086. He will also discuss what the European Union's adoption of IEC 62133 means to manufacturers along with the latest requirements related to transporting batteries. Speaker: Rich Byczek is the global technical lead for electric vehicles and energy storage at Intertek. He has 19 years of experience in product development and validation testing, 10 of which have been spent at Intertek. Rich is also an expert in the areas of energy storage, audio equipment and EMC. He sits on several SAE, IEC, UL and ANSI standards panels. Rich holds a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering from Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, Mich., and is based in the Intertek facility in Plymouth, Mich.

State of Wireless Power Transfer - Standards, Certification, Consortia, etc.

Room: San Jose
State of Wireless Power Transfer - Standards, Certification, Consortia, etc
Answer Sung (Underwriters Laboratories, Taiwan)
While the popularity of wireless devices has multiplied, so have cables and chargers around the home & office and/or on the go. Yet true mobility has remained elusive, creating an increasing demand among consumers to eliminate the 'last wire'. As a result, wireless power charging options are rapidly emerging, and wireless power interoperability across rechargeable electronic devices is expected to grow as well. Industry standards, including safety and interoperability, are of increasing importance in the effort to make these technologies become more commonplace. This presentation looks at the current state of technology, safety aspects, consortia/alliances, conformance specifications, certifications and standards associated with the emergence of Wireless Power Transfer.

Residential Solar and Electric Vehicle Bonding and Grounding Methods for Galvanic Compatibility

Room: Santa Clara
Residential Solar and Electric Vehicle Bonding and Grounding Methods for Galvanic Compatibility
Dheena Moongilan (Alcatel-Lucent & Alcatel-Lucent, USA)
Residential Photovoltaic (PV) panels are typically roof-top mounted and their accompanying DC/AC inverters are either collocated or installed inside the building. The PV panels and associated DC/AC inverter metal enclosures must be interconnected and grounded to a grounding-electrode according to NEC690.41-64. A small potential difference exists between the enclosure and its interconnection to the ground. The potential differences between a PV system enclosure and its ground wire, as well as, the potential differences between the inverter enclosure and its ground wire are at opposite polarities. Likewise, an Electric Vehicle (EV) controller enclosure and its ground interconnection, and a battery and its ground interconnection are also at opposite polarities. This observation can be generalized to any collocated generator and load DC power system. Since the interconnection potential difference and galvanic voltage are either at opposite or same polarities, the traditional galvanic compatibility rules can't be applied to the generator and load enclosures where one side of the DC supply circuit is intentionally connected to earth ground at the source and load enclosures. This is because significantly less corrosive damage occurs under conditions of opposite polarity versus conditions of like (same) polarity. This article discusses galvanic compatibility issues of PV panels and EV groundings while providing a solution for this challenge using electrochemistry and electric circuit theory.

Tuesday, May 6, 13:45 - 14:45

ESD Design - Troubleshooting & Demonstrations Part I

Room: Carmel

Overview of IEC Safety Requirements for Micro Fuel Cells

Room: Monterey
Overview of IEC Safety Requirements for Micro Fuel Cells
Harry Jones (Consultant, USA)
Micro fuel cells are small electrical power sources that are either integrated into end use products or are standalone devices generally designed for use with consumer electronics products such as cell phones and laptop personal computers. Micro fuel cells incorporate small fuel cell stacks that are driven by chemical fuel and oxygen from air to produce electricity. Various chemical fuels and fuel processing systems have been proven to be operational in at least the prototype design stage. The primary fuel is contained in fuel cartridges that are essentially throwaway and replaced by a fresh cartridge much like a battery. Micro fuel cells will continue to provide rated electrical power as long as fuel and oxygen are provided to the cell stack. Commercialization of micro fuel cells has not rolled out in a significant way. The presentation will provide some insight into safety related challenges. The micro fuel cell developers have been working successfully with various international and national hazardous material transportation regulators, especially those focused on commercial aviation safety, due to the properties of chemical fuels under development. IEC 62282-6-100 (ED. 1), developed by IEC TC105 WG8 - Micro fuel cells - Safety provides product safety requirements for the evaluation of micro fuel cells. Several chemical fuels are covered. The development of a second edition is underway to enhance the requirements as well as to address some new chemical fuels. This presentation will provide insight on the approach for the development of safety requirements and for the work currently in progress for a second edition standard.

Global Substance Regulations Impacting the Electrical Industry

Room: San Jose
Global Substance Regulations Impacting the Electrical Industry
Joe Langton (Intertek, USA)
The European Union REACH regulation, recast of the EU RoHS 2 Directive, WEEE, EuP Directives and various global substance regulations impose significant challenges for the electrical and electronics industry. Additional legislation such as energy use in products is also being implemented in more countries around the world. To succeed in this evolving industry, it is imperative that the manufacturing industry is able to anticipate and meet these emerging regulatory and customer-driven requirements surrounding chemicals and sustainability. To do so, knowledge of international standards and experience with regulated substances are essential to help manufacturers achieve compliance. During this presentation, Joe Langton, business service line leader for the chemical industry at Intertek, will explain systematic restricted and declarable substance compliance and assessment methods based on supply chain information, analytical testing and engineering judgment. In addition, he will discuss strategies and methods for analytical testing for substances of very high concern (SVHC), which can assist manufacturers in developing a risk-based test program focusing their efforts on the highest risk parts and SVHCs. Joe will also highlight the new international standard for materials declaration and other important standards. Speaker: Joe Langton is the business service line leader for the chemical industry at Intertek. For the past five years, he has provided comprehensive compliance solutions related to the RoHS Directive, Restricted Substances, CPSIA, REACH, End of Life Management and Electronics Recycling, Environmentally Preferable Materials and California Proposition 65. Joe is based in the Intertek office located in Allentown, Penn.

Equipotentiality and Grounding Derivation of grounding resistance for equipment

Room: Santa Clara
Equipotentiality and Grounding Derivation of grounding resistance for equipment
Richard Nute (IEEE Product Safety Engineering Society & Richard Nute Product Safety Consultant, USA)
Equipotentiality is one means of preventing electric shock. Grounding is a specific kind of equipotentiality. For some kinds of power distribution systems, the resistance of the grounding circuit in an electrical product is critical to establishing equipotentiality. This paper explains equipotentiality and how it provides protection against electric shock. This paper also describes the grounding circuit for the various power distribution systems. Finally, this paper shows the effect of the product grounding resistance on the voltage of accessible parts, and validates the value required by various safety standards.

Tuesday, May 6, 14:45 - 15:45

ESD Design - Troubleshooting & Demonstrations Part II

Room: Carmel

Latent Defect Characterization using Lithium Ion Cells

Room: Monterey
Latent Defect Characterization using Lithium Ion Cells
Jan Swart (Exponent Inc., USA)
High energy density, reliability, weight, and space saving have made Lithium-Ion batteries the preferred choice of electrochemistry in mobile applications. It is therefore not surprising that the aviation industry, automotive, and telecommunication industries are considering and using Lithium-Ion battery systems to power their needs. However, moving from an aqua based chemistry to Lithium-Ion is a paradigm shift and many factors needs to be considered to ensure reliability and safety. Unique failure modes may occur and need to be understood. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical stress testing was performed on a random sample of 18650 cells from various manufacturers. The performance of the cells was evaluated over time while being cycled and signatures identifying the stress condition were investigated. An additional set of pouch construction cells was trickle charged over a three month period and the effects were investigated at electrode level. This presentation describes the tests that were performed and our observations.

RAPEX-System and Intervention of European Market Surveillance Authorities - Burden or Relief?

Room: San Jose
RAPEX-System and Intervention of European Market Surveillance Authorities - Burden or Relief?
Thomas Klindt and Susanne Wende (Noerr LLP, Germany)
Manufacturers from the U.S. who distribute their products to customers in the European Market have to deal with the harmonised system of European product safety law. This system does not only contain specific product safety provisions but also provides an administrative procedure in regard to product risks. The presentation will give an overview on European product safety law focusing on the manufacturer's possibilities to participate with his own arguments in this administrative procedure: As a first part, the presentation will give a very brief overview on the system of European product safety law (product liability, product safety related obligations and criminal liability). Based on this introduction, the practical consequences of a detected product risk for manufacturers will be pointed out. The European Union established the "Community Rapid Information System" ("RAPEX") to effectively protect consumers from product risks. RAPEX is part of the European system of product safety law, specifically the so called "New Legislative Framework". On the one hand, RAPEX is an online-platform for consumer products with serious risks. Every person can access this platform and see every single consumer product (including a picture, the brand, the manufacturer) which was notified by a national market surveillance authority as causing a serious risk. On the other hand, RAPEX comprises a complete system of risk assessment and action to be taken to prevent harm to consumers' health. The system is codified in the European General Product Safety Directive 2001/95/EC and specific Directives for different products. The European Commission published "Guidelines for the management of the Community Rapid Information System 'RAPEX'" (hereinafter referred to as "RAPEX-Guidelines") which substantiate these provisions. The RAPEX-Guidelines contain binding rules for the national market surveillance authorities in the EU Member States. Developing a risk assessment following the RAPEX-Guidelines, therefore, is the best option for a manufacturer to establish a basis for his decision making that reflects the approach of a market surveillance authority. A product risk obliges the manufacturer to take the appropriate action to avert any hazard caused by such risk. In case of b2c-products, a detected product risk also causes the obligation to notify such risk to the competent market surveillance authority. Such notification marks the starting point of an administrative procedure. An administrative procedure might, however, also be started by the market surveillance authority itself. During this procedure, the market surveillance authority assesses the product risk and finds the appropriate action to avert a possible hazard in accordance with the RAPEX-Guidelines. The manufacturer shall be heard during this procedure and the measures proposed by the manufacturer shall be taken into consideration. The market surveillance authority is - if the legal requirements are fulfilled - authorized to oblige the manufacturer to take specific action in regard to a product risk. The manufacturer has a variety of possibilities to impact the procedure. Additionally, legal remedies against an administrative order are possible. These possibilities within the system of European product safety law will be pictured in the third part of the presentation.

Requirements For Modular Data Centers

Room: Santa Clara
Requirements For Modular Data Centers
Anh Nguyen and Randy Ivans (UL LLC, USA)
Modular Data Centers (MDCs) are an important trend in data center architecture. Their construction, installation and use results in a unique hybrid piece of equipment that falls somewhere in between a large enclosure and a pre-fabricated building. Existing equipment standards such as UL 60950-1 or UL 62368-1 are not equipped to deal with the complexity, customization and scalability of Modular Data Centers. This paper explores some of the specialized requirements in UL Subject 2755 (SU 2755), Outline of Investigation for Modular Data Centers [ ] that address the safety issues associated with these large pieces of equipment. This paper also discusses the new Article 646 in the National Electrical Code (NEC) [ ] that provides clarity for end users and Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJs) relating to their installation and use.

Tuesday, May 6, 15:45 - 16:00

Coffee Break - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Tuesday, May 6, 16:00 - 16:45

Keynote #2 - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

Bio: As founder and CEO Christian Stammel has more than 20 years' experience in marketing and sales as well as an excellent international network. Using this expertise he supported numerous international companies of all sizes regarding business development, technology marketing, and increase of sales activities with his innovation and marketing company Navispace AG. The natural next step to Navispace's huge success "Wearable Technology" was the incorporation of the Wearable Technologies AG in 2011. Since then, WT served as a business accelerator for more than 3000 renowned companies and will remain the key hub for marketing new technologies in this field in the years to come. http://www.wearable-technologies.com/

Abstract: Being a pioneer and evangelist for the wearable technologies market Christian will look into challenges and opportunities for this field of technology. Having led countless discussions on the topic in the past he will be sharing his view on wearable devices currently on the market and point out potential problem areas. Technologies worn close and constantly on the body have special requirements and some are not easy to overcome. Join Christian for this deep dive behind the scenes of the hyped wearable tech topic.

Tuesday, May 6, 16:45 - 18:00

FIRST Demonstration - Exhibits

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade

The Monta Vista Robotics Team (MVRT) will be holding a demonstration at the Symposium highlighting Robotics at the High School level.

The Monta Vista Robotics Team (MVRT) is a high school robotics team in Cupertino, CA competing in the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition. FIRST announces a new game every year in January and challenges teams to build a robot to play for the game. Through six intense weeks, MVRT members work with engineers and advisors to brainstorm, design, prototype, fabricate, assemble, wire and program a 120 pound robot. After the six-week build period, the robot is immediately shipped off to compete at regional and championship competitions. http://www.mvrt.com/

Wednesday, May 7, 07:00 - 12:30

Registration

Room: Bayshore Foyer

Wednesday, May 7, 07:00 - 08:00

Speaker Breakfast

Room: San Carlos

Wednesday, May 7, 08:00 - 09:00

Evaluating Interference Issues with Wireless Networks

Room: Carmel
Evaluating Interference Issues with Wireless Networks
Kenneth Wyatt (Wyatt Technical Services, USA)
As wireless networks become more prolific, not only conventional networks, but with personal area networks (PAN), wireless local area networks (WLAN) and "Internet of Things" (IoT) technology, the 2.4 and 5 GHz ISM bands are becoming filled with competing transmissions with correspondingly reduced data throughput. This presentation will address the common wireless technologies, how various network technologies coexist and how network performance may be mapped and measured. Examples of home and fitness applications, with a special emphasis on current hospital environments and wireless patient monitoring will also be described. Finally, several measuring instruments and software tools will also be demonstrated.

Are Amps and Volts Created Equal?

Room: Monterey

This paper briefly reviews the way current IT and consumer electronics safety standards treat the risk of electrically caused fire is purely proportional to power. That implies it is symmetrical in regards to available voltage and current. It then proposes a simple general model to divide electrical failure modes that may be fire risks into two distinct types series and parallel resistive faults. It considers the relative merits of real inductors and capacitors as energy storage devices. Then it looks at some real world high voltage and high current electrical sources and failure modes, and finally argues based on the previous points that the available voltage is a greater risk factor than the available current.

Are Amps and Volts Created Equal?
Gary Tornquist (Microsoft Corp., USA)
This paper briefly reviews the way current IT and consumer electronics safety standards treat the risk of electrically caused fire is purely proportional to power. That implies it is symmetrical in regards to available voltage and current. It then proposes a simple general model to divide electrical failure modes that may be fire risks into two distinct types series and parallel resistive faults. It considers the relative merits of real inductors and capacitors as energy storage devices. Then it looks at some real world high voltage and high current electrical sources and failure modes, and finally argues based on the previous points that the available voltage is a greater risk factor than the available current.

ANEC The European consumer voice in standardization

Room: San Jose
ANEC The European consumer voice in standardisation
Helmut Hintz, Hi (NGO & ANEC, Germany)
Standardisation is a private and not a public activity. Moreover, the consumer expertise needed in the development of European standards is scarce or non-existent in many countries. With the standards development work in CEN & CENELEC based on the contribution of national delegations, ANEC was created to address this national fragmentation by providing one coherent and effective consumer voice at the European level. As such, ANEC is greater than the sum of its national parts. ANEC was established in 1995 as an international non-profit association. It is a non-governmental organisation representing the consumer interest in standardisation. It is funded exclusively by the European Union (through the Executive Agency for Health and Consumers) and EFTA. Its Secretariat is based in Brussels. ANEC has three main objectives: - to represent the consumer interest in the development of European technical standards - to represent the consumer interest in the use of European technical standards (including conformity assessment and certification) -to represent the consumer interest in the development or revision of European legislation and policies that affect products and services, especially in relation to standardisation. ANEC is liaison of IEC TC 108 (Safety of electronic equipment within the field of audio/video, information technology and communication technology) since 2008 and is working active in developing IEC standards 60950; 60065 and 62368.

Energy Efficiency Testing

Room: Santa Clara
Energy Efficiency Testing
Uwe Meyer (TUV Rheinland of North America, Inc., USA)
There are significant opportunities for consumers and businesses to save energy by using energy efficient products. Energy use in homes, buildings, and industry account for two thirds of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States alone. Several programs, for example the Energy Star Program in the US or the eco-design implementing measures according to the European Directive 2009/125/EC ('Eco-design of Energy-Related Products') have been instrumental in reducing the energy use by creating awareness of energy efficient products in order to reduce energy consumption. While the Energy Star program in the U.S. is a voluntary program, the European Directives are mandatory for given energy-related products via implementing measures and voluntary agreements. This presentation will give you some introduction into the efficiency programs for the U.S., Canada and for Europe, discussing mainly IT products.

Wednesday, May 7, 09:00 - 10:00

How I Use Social Media & The Internet for Networking, Branding & Providing Customer Value

Room: Carmel
How I Use Social Media & The Internet for Networking, Branding & Providing Customer Value
Kenneth Wyatt (Wyatt Technical Services, USA)
Kenneth will describe tips on how he establishes partnerships with test labs, vendors and technical editors to help drive business. He'll describe how to establish brand recognition and "web presence", by providing customer value through conventional networking and the use of LinkedIn, publishing, blogging and participation in EMC-related forums and IEEE events. Many engineers are introverts — we're thinkers and planners. We like to deal with problems and ideas, not necessarily with people. Stop thinking of your business events as "networking opportunities" and start thinking of them as opportunities to help people. Be a giver, not a taker. Change your mindset from a selfish one to an unselfish one. It'll come back around, trust me. If you can provide a benefit or helping hand to someone, they'll remember that down the road when they actually need your services. Meet people and look for ways you can help them. Understand their business, their pain points, and their challenges—keep them in mind. Then, when you come across a helpful article, eBook, application, referral, and so forth, send it to them. Don't expect anything back in return. Be genuine.

Lightning Surge Damage to Ethernet and POTS Ports Connected to Inside Wiring

Room: Monterey
Lightning Surge Damage to Ethernet and POTS Ports Connected to Inside Wiring
Joseph Randolph (Randolph Telecom, Inc., USA)
In recent years, many suppliers of telecom equipment have reported higher than expected rates of lightning damage to Ethernet and POTS ports connected to cables located entirely within the same building. There are three known mechanisms by which lightning surges can be coupled onto inside wiring, but these mechanisms are statistically infrequent. Given the reported rates of surge damage, these known mechanisms do not provide a simple explanation. It appears that additional surge coupling mechanisms may be involved. The three known mechanisms are described, and it is shown that surge damage from these mechanisms should be infrequent. Three new theories for additional coupling mechanisms are then described. All three of these new theories are based on the notion that surges appearing on the AC mains outlets in the building are being coupled onto inside wiring communication cables. The analysis suggests that the first of these additional coupling mechanisms seems an unlikely cause for the apparent increase in surge failures. The second mechanism appears more plausible, particularly because it correlates to the recent industry trend of implementing wall mount Class II AC mains power supplies as switching converters rather than traditional linear supplies. However, the theory behind this second mechanism only applies to surge failures of Ethernet ports. A third potential mechanism is based on unintended side effects of consumer grade multi-port surge protectors used in installations with poor grounding. This mechanism applies to both Ethernet and POTS failures. Further study will be necessary to determine whether any of the three additional mechanisms are in fact the cause of the apparent increase in field failures. In the meantime, some guidelines are presented for manufacturers who wish to implement enhanced surge protection on Ethernet and POTS ports that connect to inside wiring.

Product DNA: Materials Traceability, Safety, and Collaborative Sustainability

Room: San Jose
ProductDNA: Materials Traceability, Safety, and Collaborative Sustainability
Rakesh Vazirani (TUV Rheinland, Hong Kong)
a. Problem Statement As our world gears up co-exist more sustainably with our environment, our industries are facing several environmental directives governing global trade. Adherence to these requirements is a must for businesses operating globally in order to avoid the risk of noncompliance and an exclusion from their markets of choice. b. Objectives Exercising due diligence to support safety requirements and ensuring design for environmental compliance requires that organizations capture detailed information to link the supply network with smart safety and sustainability metrics. c. Procedures A digital database Platform is essential that gives manufacturers and their supply chain visibility of their products' compliance status against constantly changing environmental requirements, thus supporting their endeavor of proactive design for compliance. A quality management system must drill all the way down to the chemical-substances in a Bill Of Materials (BOM) - to reveal the compliance risk buried in parts and formulas. Enhanced digital traceability of Product components and compliance analysis against environmental regulations means, hazardous substances can be easily eliminated and costly recalls can be avoided. The underlying data set must be extendable that captures Supplementary Traceability information such as ProductMiles, Energy Usage, Water Usage, Packaging Material Information.

Comparison between fire enclosure requirements in IEC 60950-1 and IEC 62368-1

Room: Santa Clara
Comparison between fire enclosure requirements in IEC 60950-1 and IEC 62368-1
Jim Kao (Underwriters Laboratories Taiwan Co., Ltd., Taiwan)
Equipment fire enclosures for ICT equipment are intended to minimize the spread of fire or flames from within, a fundamental principle that has not changed for decades. However, there has been increasing interest by manufacturers to push the largely prescriptive requirements to the limit, for example use of larger enclosure openings to meet increased ventilation (cooling) demands, minimization of weight, reduced material and fabrication costs, and so on. In this presentation the author is first going to discuss what the difference between IEC 60950-1 and IEC 62368-1 related to fire enclosures, and then present possible strategies to be able to meet both standards ,allowing for a potentially a smoother transition between standards.

Wednesday, May 7, 10:00 - 11:00

Ken's Top Ten EMC Design Issues

Room: Carmel
Ken's "Top Ten" EMC Design Issues
Kenneth Wyatt (Wyatt Technical Services, USA)
Because time-to-market and budget factors often drive many of today's high-tech designs, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues often surface at the last moment in the design cycle, potentially delaying product introductions. Very often, simple design reviews can identify issues early when the cost of implementation is substantially lower and design improvements may be made with less impact on schedules. After serving Hewlett-Packard and Agilent Technologies as their chief EMC engineer for over 20 years and an EMC consultant for many more years following retirement, I tend to see the same product design issues over and over. This seminar covers the most common EMC product design issues I've observed and explains why they are an impact on EMC failures during compliance testing. By attending this seminar, you'll learn these simple design practices and have a better chance of heading off EMC problems before shipping your product (and design staff) to the EMC test facility.

Quantitative Solder Inspection with Computed Tomography

Room: Monterey
Quantitative Solder Inspection with Computed Tomography
Ray Huang, Adam Sorini and John McNulty (Exponent, USA)
In this paper, we present a quantitative, three-dimensional method to analyze solder characteristics, defect/void percentage, and plating volume with computed tomography (CT), as well as a range of case studies where this methodology has enabled a more precise and time-efficient quality assurance process for both the printed circuit board suppliers, manufacturers, and designers. This methodology also allows a comprehensive, non-destructive inspection and re-construction of failed samples (from evaluation, qualification, or field use). Particular examples of the case studies included in this paper are: analysis of a plated through-hole according to IPC-A-610 Section 7.5.5.1 (Supported Holes - Solder - Vertical Fill), analysis of a ball grid array according to Section 8.2.12.4 (Surface Mount Area Array - Voids), as well as several hand-soldered printed circuit boards used in consumer electronic applications that have experienced thermal damage.

Safety Design Issues for Consumer Electronics Power Supplies

Room: San Jose
Safety Design Issues for Consumer Electronics Power Supplies
Stefan Mozar (UNSW, Sydney & Dynexsys Pty Ltd, Australia)
This paper will show issues that designers and safety engineers should consider when designing or evaluating switchmode power supplies for consumer products such as TV receivers, audio equipment, computers, and white goods like washing machines for example. All these units are powered off the mains supply. This makes these units a potential hazard, unless appropriate design considerations are made. A power supply as shown in application notes and text books is not safe for use. Testing prescribed by test houses, where the power supply under goes a number of tests helps identify potential safety hazards. These tests are generally go-no go in nature, and do not always consider the reliability of the power supply. Such issues are discussed in this paper. Some examples are the effects of long term temperature rise, solder joint quality, hidden failures. The attached power point slides give a basic over view of presentation content and the contents of the proposed paper.

IEC 62368-1: Latest News on the Standard and Its Adoption

Room: Santa Clara
IEC 62368-1: Latest News on Standard and Adoption
Thomas M Burke, PE (UL LLC, USA); Jerry Dikun (UL LLC., USA)
With the publication of Edition No. 1 of IEC 62368-1 in January 2010, and subsequent publication of several national and regional versions, like CSA C22.2 No. 62368-1/UL 62368-1 in Canada and the U.S., initial steps have been taken towards the eventual replacement of IEC 60065 (Safety of Audio/Video Equipment) and IEC 60950-1 (Safety of Information Technology Equipment) with a new hazard-based standard covering both AV & ICT equipment. However, Edition No. 1 was not adopted by most countries/regions since they opted to wait until a more mature and refined Edition No. 2 was published. Now, with the recent publication of Edition No. 2 in March 2014, and the expected pending publication of Edition No. 2-based versions of EN 62368-1 and CSA/UL 62368-1 within several months, manufacturers can begin preparing in earnest for the formal transition from the IEC 60065- and IEC 60950-based standards to IEC 62368-1 and its national and regional versions. This presentation will not be a review of the technical content of the IEC 62368-1 standard itself, but will concentrate on timely updates and adoption considerations important to manufacturers so they can begin planning for the transition towards global implementation of this new standard.

Wednesday, May 7, 11:00 - 12:45

Closing Session

Room: Donner, Siskiyou, Cascade